Bibliography



Many of my posts are based on books that I have read; I am limiting this bibliography to books on history and political philosophy.  For some of the books, multiple posts have been written. 

·        Gar Alperovitz, The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb


·        Jacques Barzun, From Dawn to Decadence: 1500 to the Present: 500 Years of Western Cultural Life

·        Jack Beatty, The Lost History of 1914: How the Great War Was Not Inevitable

·        Hilaire Belloc, The Crusades: The World’s Debate

·        Lerone Bennett, Jr., Forced Into Glory: Abraham Lincoln’s White Dream

·        Kai Bird and Lawrence Lifschultz (editors), Hiroshima's Shadow: Writings on the Denial of History and the Smithsonian Controversy


·        James Bradley, The China Mirage: The Hidden History of American Disaster in Asia

·        C. John Caddoux, The Early Christian Attitude to War

·        RHC Davis, A History of Medieval Europe


·        John Finnis, Joseph M. Boyle, Jr., and Germain Grisez, Nuclear Deterrence, Morality and Realism


·        Paul Fussell, The Great War and Modern Memory


·        Jean Gimpel, The Medieval Machine


·        Joan Grant, The Monster Who Grew Small

o   God of War

·        Jochen Hellbeck, Stalingrad: The City That Defeated the Third Reich

·        Herbert Hoover, Freedom Betrayed


·        Jeffrey Rogers Hummel, Emancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men

·        Merrill Jensen, The New Nation: A History of the United States During the Confederation 1781 – 1789

·        Bertrand de Jouvenel, On Power: The Natural History of its Growth


·        Fritz Kern, Kingship and Law in the Middle Ages

·        Robert Latouche, The Birth of Western Economy


·        Robert Nisbet, Roosevelt and Stalin: The Failed Courtship

·        Régine Pernoud, Those Terrible Middle Ages: Debunking the Myths

·        Jean Raspail, The Camp of the Saints
o   The Camp

·        Eugene Rogan, The Fall of the Ottomans

·        Murray Rothbard, For a New Liberty: The Libertarian Manifesto

·        Gerd Schultze-Rhonhof, 1939 – The War That Had Many Fathers



·        Timothy Snyder, Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin
o   Bloodlands
o   Famine
o   Terror
o   Frenemies

·        William Thomas Stead, The Americanization of the World


·        Carl Trotz, The Last of the Freemen

·        Martin Van Creveld, The Rise and Decline of the State

·        FJP Veale, Advance to Barbarism

·        George Victor, The Pearl Harbor Myth: Rethinking the Unthinkable

3 comments:

  1. Mr. Mosquito, as always enjoy your blog, in my discussions with friends and others who could be considered reasonably well informed let alone libs who know very little, the lack of any knowledge of Rhodes, MacKinder, Quigley and the concept of the world island and how virtually all of todays battles follow that outline, want to remind you to read "Conjuring Hitler" by Preparata, it fills in much on the British desire to crush Germany, reaffirming that the Great Game is always being played, what's the new plan? to get China and Russia battling? all the best, Mark

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. From the Amazon description of the book:

      "He explains that Britain, still clinging to its empire, was terrified of an alliance forming between Germany and Russia."

      In "The Silk Roads," the same issue was at stake prior to The Great War (I will write about this within the next week or two); it is still true today.

      Since I first discovered Mackinder, his thesis has rung true. Until I find a better explanation for the wars and geo-politics, I will stick with his.

      Delete